Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Interesting .....

In today's news we read:

Sydney raids find sub-machine guns

A SERIES of police raids in Sydney's west has netted 10 submachine-guns, magazines, silencers, a revolver, ammunition and cash.

Firearms and Organised Crime Squad detectives arrested three people and seized the firearms during an operation targeting the illegal manufacture of prohibited weapons.

They were investigating a syndicate allegedly involved in the making and supply of submachine-guns and other prohibited firearms.

About 8.30pm (AEDT) on Tuesday detectives executing search warrants arrested a 31-year-old Seven Hills man at Seven Hills, a 43-year-old Wentworthville man and a 30-year-old South Penrith woman at South Penrith.

At Wentworthville, police seized two non-commercially manufactured MAC-10 submachine-guns along with magazines, silencers, a revolver, ammunition and $41,850.

"Firearms that fall into the wrong hands are dangerous and police are committed to taking these firearms off our streets to ensure public safety," Firearms and Organised Crime Squad commander Detective Superintendent Arthur Katsogiannis said in a statement.

At South Penrith, police found steroids, prohibited substances and five magazines

At Seven Hills, they discovered a workshop containing metalwork machines and moulds allegedly used in the manufacture of firearms.

The 31-year-old man has been charged with manufacture prohibited firearms and sell firearms. He was refused bail to appear at Blacktown Local Court on Wednesday.

The 43-year-old man was charged with supply firearms and possess firearms. He was refused bail to appear at Penrith Local Court on Wednesday.

The 30-year-old woman was charged with possessing prohibited weapons and drug-related offences. She was granted bail to appear at Penrith Local Court on November 1.

Anyone with information about firearms-related crime in their area is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

1 comment:

Sean said...

"Non-commercially manufactured" to my eyes reads as "homemade" - the info is easily available.
Yet another example of how "banning" something doesn't close the genie of knowledge back in the bottle.